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has left the moscow airport. nbc news jim maceda. >> reporter: it's breaking news, a big deal. we're talking about six weeks of being locked up pretty much at least in a semiprison-like status at that transit lounge in the moscow airport. confirmed by snowden's lawyer today snowden was issued temporary asylum in russia for a year. that asylum is renewable year after year indefinitely. it's a big deal because we expected him to get an i.d. card only while he waited for a
that. there were several thousand files. >> reporter: the agency said in a state to nbc news, when nsa makes a mistake in carrying out
a republican chairman understandably miffed. >> folks are against the nbc's plan to produce a mini series about hillary clinton's run before she runs for president. and head of rnc demands both nbc and cnn drop their clinton projects. how will it all end? oprah speaks out about the trayvon martin shooting. did her words help or hurt racial tensions? and democrats have become the targets of late night jokes. >> it was the president's birthday. look at this recent speech. >> you will interact with all americans of all walks of life because our citizens can learn too. >> kelly: judy miller, jim pinkerton, ellen ratner and affair ard grenell. i'm kelly wright. fox news watch is on right now. >> end of the war in afghanistan doesn't mean the end of threats to our nation. as i said before even as we decimated the al-qaeda leadership that attacked us on 9/11, al-qaeda affiliates and like-minded extremists still threatened the homeland, still threaten our diplomatic facilities, still threaten our businesses abroad. we've got to take these threats seriously and do all we can to confront them. >> kelly:
. "nightly news" begins now. this is n brks krr"nbc nightly brian williams. >> good evening. i'm lester holt sitting in for brian. reinforce mts are on tonight for firefighters trying to save thousands of homes from a massive infer no still burning in central idaho. it's the biggest and most dangerous of more than three dozen wildfires. late word is they're now burning in eight western states. fr for those on the fire lines, the conditions couldn't be worse and the stakes couldn't be higher. the fire in idaho threatening at least three communities, and thousands have had to leave their homes. nbc's miguel almaguer was with firefighters on the front lines for part of the day. he's pulled back now to safer ground in nearby hailey, idaho in order to talk to us. miguel? >> reporter: this is the perfect fuel. fire loves these steep terrains. it really explodes out of control when it hits a hill like this. so much of this hill was covered with waist-high debris and brush. when it hit this fire, it took off. tonight idaho's beaver creek fire is the most dangerous, most explosive blaze in the nation
miffed about these hillary clinton film. >> even some folks at nbc against the peacock plan to produce a miniseries about hillary clinton to run before she runs for president. and the head of the rmc takes a stand. demanding nbc and cnn drop their clinton projects. how will this fall in? >>> oprah speaks out about the trayvon martin shooting. did her words help or hurt racial tensions? democrats have become the targets of late night jokes. >> yesterday was the president's birthday. he didn't let work get in the way of having a good time. take a look at this speech. >> you will interact with americans from all walks of life because -- our citizens can learn from you, too. >> judy miller, columnist and fox news contributor and jim pinkerton be contributing editor of the american conservative magazine. ellen ratner, top radio news service bureau chief. fox news contributor, richard grenell. "fox news watch" is on right now. the end of the war in afghanistan does not mean the end of threats to our nation. as i said before, even as we decimated the al qaeda leadership that attacked us on 9/
story. an nbc news exclusive. kidnapping survivor hannah anderson sets the record straight for the first time since her harrowing ordeal. "nightly news" begins now. >> announcer: from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news with brian williams". >>> good evening to our viewers in the west. i'm lester holt sitting in for brian. we begin tonight with a massive firefight across a huge part of the country. right now at least 51 wildfires are burning out of control, and there's word tonight the federal government is running out of money and resources to fight them. while in california tonight there are new evacuations near yosemite national park as a huge fire there closes in. nbc's miguel almaguer has made his way near yosemite. he starts united states off with late-breaking details. good evening. >> reporter: good evening. 84 square miles. that's what's been lost here because conditions in this forest are so dry the growth potential for this fire is extreme, and it couldn't come at a worse time. near yosemite national park, 1,300 firefighters are on their heels, f
leagues. he will get a check for more than $11,000. thanks for watching. nbc nightly news is next. firestorat 6:00. thousands more evacuated overnight as a huge wildfire spreads near a resort town in idaho, consuming more than 150 square miles. tonight, the latest from the frontlines. >>> egypt on edge. a new warning from the military against more violence as the death toll rises. plus, egypt's christian communitpaying a heavy price. >>> the death of princess diana, the latest on new allegations over how she died being examined by scotland yard, 16 years after that tragic night in paris. >>> wrongful conviction? why is this man still behind bars when even his accusers now insist he did not do it? >>> and message in a bottle, tossed into the sea, uncovered by sandy, and now returned to the man who wrote it half a century ago. >>> good evening. there are few more dangerous places in america right now than on the fire lines out west, both for those fighting the fires and those trying to flee them. there are dozens of wild fires on the move tonight, but the most dangerous is in idaho,
. >> announcer: from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. i'm lester holt in for brian. the u.s. tonight appears to have just lost a key ally as it tries to build consensus for a punishing military attack on syria. there's late word from london that britain's parliament has tonight against supporting an attack. but even as efforts towards an international consensus unravel, the white house is still pressing its case here at home for a military strike. in a conference call this evening, members of the president's national security team are briefing congressional leaders in what the white house believes is the syrian government's role in an attack. and the military response with or without international partners. we have reports from washington, as well as inside damascus tonight. andrea mitchell starts us off from washington. andrea, good evening. >> good evening, lester. tonight the president is losing momentum for quick action against syria, and thinking of the real prospect if he does act within days, he may be doing it
and colleague. >> announcer: from nbc world headquarters in new york, this is nbc nicely news with lester holt. >> good evening. it is ominous in tone and frustratingly thin on specifics, we are talking about the worldwide travel alert issued to americans overseas after u.s. intelligent caught wind al qaeda may be planning an attack against american interest. the threat is credible, but pinpointing the target or targets, officials are taking no chances. issuing a blanket travel warning and closing american embassies across much of the muslim world tomorrow. we are learning more about where the threats are coming from amid a shifting center of power. covering several angle, we go to kristen welker at the white house. >> officials say the threat could be coming from the arabian peninsula and the affiliate in yemen. in one of the most serious terror warnings in years, the state department alerted americans overseas that al qaeda could be plotting an attack and have their eyes trained on the arabian peninsula. it covers travel for americans, cautioning them to be vigilant at tourist sites and publ
away from the 98th avenue exit off interstate 880 where nbc bay area's christie smith is now with an update from police. good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you. this is a horrible story, a little baby boy shot and killed. i just spoke with an aunt who was shaken up and didn't want to go on camera, but she says she was inside the home when all this happened, that there was a houseful of children and adults, they were all sleeping when suddenly, they heard rapid gunfire coming from the rear of the home and what happened next just shocked everyone. i wanted to show you what neighbors have been leaving here, happened within the last couple of minutes, people walking up here in tears. two people were hit and the family identified the littlest victim as 1-year-old drew jackson. they call him baby drew. they say he was laying with his dad, 20-year-old andrew thomas, who was also shot and both of them tied. now, this happened around 2:45 in the morning at a home in the neighborhood of brookfield village on gormley avenue in east oakland off interstate 880. the aunt says the h
. >> and boston four months after their world was shattered. >> announcer: this is nbc nightly news with lester holt. substituting tonight, snow. >> good evening. another violent day to end a bloody week in egypt as the country decents further into chaos. the 13wri78 government may ban the muslim brotherhood, the party of mohamed morsi. supporters had been battling with security forces since wednesday when the government launched a crack down. since then officials say almost 900 people have been killed, more than 3,000 injured and more than 1100 people have been arrested. we have complete coverage tonight beginning once again with nwc's correspondent richard angle on the ground. >> good evening, kate. more gunfire in cairo as egyptian forces moved in to clear out supporterses of the muz 4ri78 brotherhood from a mosque and growing signs in the country of civil unrest. egyptians are turning on each other. supporters of the muslim brotherhood took shelter in a cairo mosque, terrified if they went outside they would be lynched by angry mobs who back the military. after a gun fight, an armed man in
in syria. our reporting team is in place tonight. first to nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent and andrea mitchell in our washington newsroom. andrea, after that speech, is there any turning back? >> reporter: no, there is not. before kerry's speech he was at the white house with the president, the other national security advisers talking about the intelligence. and they say this is what is different, the scale of the attack, the incredible number of casualties you just saw. second, the size of the target area. this intelligence map shows 12 separate locations that were hit. it is a highly coordinated attack. and third, they had spy satellites tracking the rockets from government launchers to where they landed. finally, they say assad's command and control was established from those intercepted communications you heard about revealing they've prepared to use chemicals. they told their own commanders to put on gas masks the day of the attack, and command ers a senior official is overheard telling troops to hide the evidence afterwards from the u.n. with all of that, they say, if
affiliated group. national security officials told nbc news today the threat is coming directly from al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, based in yemen, a terror group getting stronger in recent years. >> it's more dangerous because now we have what i call 2.0 or 3.0 which is widely disbursed, a anewer group. >> reporter: meanwhile, tighter screen for overseas flights. >> it always makes you nervous, but you have to carry on. just keep on going. >> i'm really worried because my wife is going to saudi arabia. >> reporter: and this morning fresh debate about the nsa's surveillance program, which intelligence officials say tipped them off about this latest threat. >> it is scary. al qaeda is on the rise in this part of the world, and the nsa program has proven its worth yet again. >> you have to be very careful about how much you represent that any particular program has contributed to our security. >> reporter: and tonight nbc is reporting that officials in pakistan has tightened security in islamabad due to a potential terror threat interethere, but s hour there's no link between the two. >> th
for a missing california teenager and her alleged abductor. nbc's joe fryer reports from the search area. >> reporter: the desperate search is on. more than 150 highway trained search, surveying this idaho wilderness from the air and trudging through the 350 square miles of rugged terrain on the ground looking for 16-year-old hannah anderson and the man police say about zucted her, 40-year-old james dimaggio. >> the resources we need search that area safely. >> reporter: this area is called the river of no return wilderness. expecting the giant network of trails winding through the back country. >> the best of the best and will take every precaution to make sure they are safe. >> reporter: the manhunt began after a house fire last weekend in southern california. the bodies of hannah anderson's mother tina and a young child discovered at the scene we now know it was anderson's 8-year-old brother evening's. that's when dimaggio kidnapped hannah anderson. the two had not been seen since wednesday when a horseback rider spot add couple matches their descriptions hiking through the thick idah
serious injuries, we are told. nbc bay area monte francis is at the scene and joins us with the latest. monte? >> good evening. according to police, four people were shot at about 4:00 this afternoon. we do not know their exact conditions. we can tell you there were no fatalities and that children were not involved. you can see police are here at the scene investigating. the shooting happened here on telegraph avenue in front of a sal loan and next door to oaksterdam university. we are told the call came in at 4:08. less than two hours ago. this crime scene is just around the corner from the 19th street b.a.r.t. station and just a few blocks from city hall. we do not have word of any arrests. we short on details as to the events. the shooting is connected to a purse snatching and bystanders were caught in the cross fire. one man that was shot had just come out of the uptown studios, asa l a salon, after getting his hair cut. telegraph avenue between 16th and 18th streets has been shut down. that's something to be aware of if you happen to be driving in this area. we are still gathering
. jay gray, nbc news. >> the fire is burning about four miles from the hedge hetchy reservoir which supplies 85% of san francisco's water. there is concern as we mentioned earlier that ash from the fire could taint the water. and two of the city's three hyd hydroelectric power stations in that area are shut down. more disruptions could impact the power supply to san francisco as well. >> and stay with nbc bay area news for continuing coverage of the fire near yosemite park. we'll have the latest on our website nbcbayarea.com, you can find more videos and photos, that's nbcbayarea.com. on the front page. >>> in oakland, police continue their efforts to find 22-month-old daphne webb. today police and the alameda county sheriff's department teamed up to search around merit college. they are looking for the toddler now missing about a month and a half. nbc bay area's kimberly tere has more on late announcements this afternoon. >> reporter: diane, in the last hour search and rescue teams returned here to merit college where the command center has been set up or was set up this morning. 4
>>> right now on nbc bay area news a possible b.a.r.t. strike is eight hours away and counting. we have team coverage this afternoon, including where negotiations stand and how riders are feeling the pressure. >>> plus, new information in san jose's latest homicide. the victim, a 19-year-old college student. >>> embassies had shut down across the middle east today. we will have the latest on what the state department is revealing about the terror threat. >>> good afternoon, i'm diane dwyer. >> i'm terry mcsweeney. we are on early because of the nfl preseason game at 5:00. >>> midnight tonight is weighing on people's finds aft near when b.a.r.t. workers say they will launch another strike a last-minute contract deal is not reached. we have coverage of the looming strike. testifiny trang in fremont, talking to b.a.r.t. riders and kimberly tere monitoring negotiations in oakland a b.a.r.t. union called a news conference and then called it off at 1:30 this afternoon. do we read much into that? >> reporter: no you really can't read much into it. i can tell you both sides showed up here
and still burning out of control. it's burned nearly 200 square miles so far. nbc bay area's monty francis arrived near the fire command post. we understand there are new evacuation orders tonight. >> reporter: diane, that's right. evacuation orders issued for pinelake mountain, parts of grove land, and despite that some residents are deciding to stay behind, even as this fire edges closer. you can see behind me, a very large -- there's a large smoke billowing in the distance. now, about 15 miles from where we are, crews inside yosemite national park are working to protect two rows of giant see coyas. the fire is a distance from the groves of iconic trees but crews are clearing brush and setting sprinklers around the sequoias as a precaution. the fire burns along the northwest edge of the park. yosemite remains open was the west entrance on highway 120 is closed. the fire started one week ago and has scorched 200 square miles, larger than the enticityf san jose. 20 structures burned and 5,000 homes threatened. many who live in the threatened homes are struggling to decide whether to evacua
only a tie knee piece of this fire. nbc's tom costello is in groveland, california, to bring us the very latest. tom, good evening. >> reporter: hi, lester. public utility crews say that they are confident they can maintain water and power to san francisco. this fire station behind me is serving as an information point so residents can get real time uptates on exactly what the fire's status is now. 5,500 homes remain threatened and this fire is in very steep terrain. >> still holding out. >> reporter: from the cockpit of a national guard c-130. >> got you in sight, coming in position behind you. >> reporter: to black hawk helicopters, the view of the down-to-dusk aerial mission to attack a fire that has grown into one the country's most serious, the challenge getting the water drop from so-called bambi buckets on just the right spot to give the ground crews a quick advantage. meanwhile on the ground, homeowners like careen and matt are on the edge, leaving on their own when the flames get too close, and returning home when the winds seem to be in their favor. >> twice we went wi
believes the case against assad is clear-cut, and here's why. nbc has learned one of the key pieces of evidence that the u.s. has to prove assad's regime was behind the chemical attack is an intercepted communication that says assad's brother, a commander of the syrian republican guard, personally ordered the attack. that's why, lester, the president is so confident about where he stands on this. >> all right, chuck todd, thanks. let's get the read from syria in all this. in and around the city of damascus, the people who live there faced with the decision whether to leave or hunker down ahead of any possible strike on any number of potential targets by the u.s. tonight bill neely has made his way inside damascus to get a firsthand look at what's happening on the ground there. >> reporter: well, there is no question there is anxiety, apprehension about what missiles might rain down on this city and when, and yet by its standards, it's been a fairerly normal day in damascus. the traffic is still flowing, shops have been open. and there is shelling in the suburbs. in fact, just a few
fire season in years, as the flames close in on yosemite. >>> and telling her story. an nbc news exclusive, kidnapping survivor hannah anderson sets the record straight for the first time since her harrowing ordeal. "nightly news" begins now. >> announcer: from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news with brian williams". >>> good evening, i'm lester holt in for brian. they are horrifying images that will instinctively make you want to look away, yet they can't be ignored. in a long war that's brought death and misery to both sides, the video evidence of what may have happened inside syria, a mass chemical will weapons attack, has shocked the world. hundreds, many children, are dead. tonight the claims of a chemical attack have still not been verified. from the syrian regimes, denials, which the obama white house which for a year has called the chemical weapons use in syria a red line is now being cautious as it calls for an investigation. you're about to see what the rebels say is the evidence, some of it very graphic. our chief foreign correspondent r
in grant money. i'm damian trujillo, nbc bay area news. there is no bart strike for now. the impasse and indecision is frustrating computers. among the new elements, should bart workers have the right to strike. here's the good news. bart trains are running today after governor brown stepped in in the 11th hour. now the waiting game yet again for the hundreds of thousands of commuters who depend on bart. nbc bay area jodi hernandez spoke with local lawmakers trying to the end the strike. >> reporter: well, the bart riders i talked to are happy that the trains are rolling. ióbwñ certainly hope they can c to a resolution that's fair on both sides. >> but with a recent seven-day cooling off period, there's still no resolution. >> we know that's temporary. that means the problem is not solved. >> governor jerry brown says he wants the resolution. he appointed three people to find out why mediators and the collective bargaining unit can't hammer out a contract the for bart workers. this time around, they ran out of time. why is this so acrimonious? some said it's the worst negotiations
over what to do about syria. >>> plus, an nbc news exclusive. a doctor on the front lines there telling us what he says is really going on. >>> state of emergency. in california, tonight an out-of-control wildfire the size of denver now raging inside of yosemite. >>> plus, a freak hailstorm and now the threat of flash floods. a wild weekend ahead for millions. >>> judgment day for the army major accused of a massacre at ft. hood. the deadliest mass murder on a base in u.s. history. >>> and gift of time. there's never enough of it. and what would you do if suddenly you had the time to do all of the things you really want? "nightly news" begins now. >> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >> good evening. brian is off tonight. i'm lester holt. >>> there is word tonight the pentagon is drawing up military options to respond to this week's atrocities in syria, as the white house comes under increasing pressure to act. those horrible images of lifeless civilians killed by what the rebels say were chemical weapons has sparked internatio
figure out alternative options for commuters should a nbc bay area news.çpr(t&háhp &hc >>> now aside from coming to a deal, the biggest obstacle come monday will bec finding another way to get to work and to get home at the end of the day. scott budman >qájju us from the home at the ÷ d of the day. transportation tips for us. >> jessica, there a" several alternatives fort( commuters wh need to get to and from work, ti find them you need to reach no further than your smartphone. alternatives like side car say they expect a huge jump in business on monday xdw3Ñiokcmor. side car and fellow san share company uber got big boosts last time. they expect the phonmsvÑi to ri again. >> we've been able to takeçóc t power of the smartphone and social mediafá and build that trust. our riders tell us allt(çó the that theyt( feel safer in a rid they found through side car than taxi. >> another way to go isçó karma which matches people to carpool that isx w3t(ok app and phoneç#u d:iuz you.to find a driver close svyt of the customers who tried them out stayed, so the strike was good for some
. are the benghazi attacks and irs spying on americans phony? how did the media react? nbc and cnn are producing movies about hillary clintclinton. the media can't get enough of anthony weiner as more details emerge about his sorted >>> a connecticut paper takes a at conservatives and fox news with comparisons to the kkk. that got some reaction from the king of cable. >> i'm not going to let this go. >> and teen sensation justin bieber takes a hit for being pro-life. on the panel this week, writer and fox news contributor judy miller. meteorite.com columnist joe pack ka. ellen ratner, talk radio news service bureau chief. and fox news contributor richard grenell. i'm john scott. "fox news watch" is on right now. >>> this with endless parade of distractions and phony the point is, with an endless distraction of political posturing. endless parade of distractions and political posturing and phony scandals. so far for most of this year, we've seen an endless parade and distractions and political posturing and phony scandals and we keep on shifting our attention away from what we should be focused o
that was specific in our search scope. >> a police source tells nbc bay area coke's cell phone was tracked to the area. coke's sister said coke's teenage daughter used the find my iphone app sunday night. >> like a good technologically savvy teenager, she saw her mom's phone zigzagging all over the north bay area. we know it came to rest in richmond. it seemed to be all over in oakland and vacaville and different neighborhoods. >> reporter: a police source says surveillance cameras captured the car crossing a bridge. another camera showed coke's former boyfriend, parolee randy alano, gassing up her car and using her atm card. alana, who has been arrested on a parole violation and named a personal of interest in the case, was found with coke's fees and her credit card. he also had on muddy boots. >> this is an ongoing investigation. it's evolving and evolving quickly now. things have happened. a body has been located. >> reporter: the body has not yet been removed from the scene, and when it is, we are told it will be taken to the county coroner's office to be identified. so far we haven't
.n. chemical weapons inspectors have finally been allowed in to ground zero of last week's attack. nbc's richard engel made it into syria today. he is now safely back on the turkish side of the border with a lot more on today's fast-moving developments. richard, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. some western officials believe that president bashar al assad personally ordered the use of chemical weapons. tonight, the white house says no final decision has been made about any u.s. military action. >> reporter: u.n. inspectors today in damascus. one of their vehicles shot by a sniper, but after a brief delay they finally began their work interviewing survivors, doctors and taking samples. but this may already be a side show. the u.s. and others already believe the assad regime used chemical weapons last week on a scale not seen anywhere in decades. so america is once again building a case for military action. >> there must be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons. >> reporter: the likely action cruise missile strikes from four u.s. navy des
engel tells nbc news in part, quote, there's ample precedent for the president to initially take action without having a formal vote from congress. and a new nbc news poll shows 50% of americans oppose u.s. and military action in syria, and 8 in 10 believe president obama should get congressional approval before using any force. that information just in to us. we have reports now from the middle east and london for you. we're going to start with nbc's ayman moyheldin in beirut. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, richard. u.s. inspectors on the ground inside syria are wrapping up their final day by visiting a military hospital, speaking to syrian troops also allegedly affected by chemical weapons. their mandate expires tomorrow. they will be leaving the country. they'll be taking some of the samples and evidence they've managed to gettinger over the last several days to various laboratories in europe to determine the nature of the chemical weapons. what's more important is that they're not meant to assign blame. they are not meant to determine who used the chemical weapons but simp
if the adrenaline rush was worth it today, sunday, august 25th, 2013. >>> from nbc news, this is "today" with lester holt and erica hill, live from rockefeller plaza. >>> and welcome to "today" on this sunday morning. i'm erica hill. >> and aisle carl in for lester holt. along with dylan dryer. it's a tough situation for the firefighters trying to get a handle on the massive fire burning in yosemite national park. officials say it's created its own weather pattern making it too unpredictable to control. we're going to get the latest in just a moment. >> scary stuff there. also ahead this morning, the escalating situation in syria. defense secretary chuck hagel saying today the u.s. military is ready to act if ordered to do so by the president. he says all options are being considered at this point. we are live in the region with new development. >> plus, we'll take you to an emotional memorial service that was held saturday for the mother and brother of kidnapped teen hannah anderson. >> tough one there. we'll bring you the very latest on that. and also, i'm not sure if you've heard these statistics
of nbc and cnn. it's all over planned documentaries on hillary clinton. despite gop demands to drop them as unfair, rnc officials have threatened to ban nbc and cnn from primary presidential debates in 2016. an 8-month-old boy is safe after being kidnapped and taken on a 100-mile-per-hour chase. police were able to knock the car off the road, forcing is suspect to flee on toot. the child was unharmed and may have even slept through the entire ordeal. >>> now for a look at the weather, i'm joined by bill karins. amazing video and the kid was okay, possibly even sleeping. >> and hopefully going to a safe home. >> yesterday was salt lake city it was nearly 100 degrees. the record was 101. boise was 99. and that is because of the front that's along the coast. a middle morning, not much significant to talk about there. this map in the best is about as blank as you get for this or any time of year. richard thinks he could do this job. so as far as the high pressure goes, it sits off of the rockies. it will keep you cloudy and cooler than we have been in the west. the temperatures will hold. if
the the way east to bangladesh, including cairo, where nbc's ayman mohyeldin reports. >> reporter: this latest terrorist threat comes as the u.s. embassy here already faces violent street protests. that's why they've already put up blast walls like this and have beefed up additional security. >> reporter: and in kabul, atiyah abawi. >> an official i spoke to here said this is one of the most serious warnings they have received in a long time. security measures in place include restricted movements. that means no embassy car will be leaving the compound. and as for the afghan staff, they will not be coming into work. >> reporter: and the list could grow on monday. the state department also issued a worldwide travel alert today, warning of the potential for terrorist attacks by al qaeda and its affiliates against both official and private interests in the region and beyond from now until the end of august. and specifically citing past attacks against subway and rail systems, aviation and maritime services. the most likely place for an attack, the alert warned of attacks possibly occurring in or
deen than of martin luther king jr. chuck todd and andrea mitchell condemn nbc's plan to do a mini series on hillary clinton. lots going on this friday morning. we'll tell you all about it right here. to the fire. are you encouraged by what you heard the president say the other night? is this personal, or is it political? a lot of my work happens by doing the things that i'm given to doing anyway, by staying in touch with everything that is going on politically and putting my own nuance on it. in reality it's not like they actually care. this is purely about political grandstanding. i've worn lots of hats, but i've always kept this going. i've been doing politics now for a dozen years. (vo) he's been called the epic politics man. he's michael shure and his arena is the war room. >> these republicans in congress that think the world ends at the atlantic ocean border and pacific ocean border. the bloggers and the people that are sort of compiling the best of the day. i do a lot of looking at those people as well. not only does senator rubio just care about rich people, but somehow
, remarkably no one was killed. nbc's kerry sanders is there with late details. kerry, i assume you're on firm ground right now, but how big a danger area at risk is there? >> reporter: well, good evening, lester. they've moved us back three city blocks fearing the sinkhole would continue to grow. the problem actually begins about 20 to 100 feet down where there's limestone. rainwater goes through the earth and hits that limestone, and it can cause it to dissolve. that is a recipe for disaster. >> we have a building that can potentially collapse. we don't know if it's a sinkhole or what. >> we need to know what room everybody was in. >> reporter: it was shortly after 3:00 in the morning, and maggie started her camera phone amid the chaos. she says it came without warning while on vacation with family and friends from virginia, she heard a single window pop its frame, then another and another. at first she thought it was someone in a fight. >> things flying, like glass flying. people jumping out of windows. luggage flying out of windows, people trying to salvage what they could. >> to me, it so
government to end the violence? a lot, actually, so why won't it? nbc's david gregory tonight on the obama administration caught between a rock and a hard place. >> reporter: egypt's bloody crackdown has critics asking whether american taxpayers are footing the bill for all the violence. why the blame? follow the money. the amount of u.s. aid to egypt is an estimated $1.5 billion each year, including aircraft and tanks and military training for officers. only four other countries, including israel and iraq, get more. the president may condemn the violence -- >> we deplore violence against civilians. >> reporter: -- but won't call for an end to the aid. one adviser calls that a, quote, knee-jerk move at this point. critics argue the time is now. america's only leverage to pull egypt back from the brink is the money. >> at the end of the day, i don't want american dollars to be used by this interim government to basically kill their way into power. >> reporter: u.s. aid to egypt dates back to the camp david accords of 1979. it buys the u.s. military's access to the suez canal, which connects
by nbc news. many too disturbing to broadcast. >> that is disturbing and horrible. >> reporter: we showed the footage to an independent chemical weapons expert. >> these pictures are obviously compatible with the well-known symptoms of nerve gas attack. >> reporter: not one attack, rebels say, but a barrage of surface-to-surface rockets filled with poison gas and fired at at least ten villages outside damascus early this morning. the syrian government denies using chemical weapons, something president obama has warned against. >> that's a red line for us, and there would be enormous consequences. >> reporter: but washington never backed up that threat, even after u.s. intelligence said in june that syria had used chemical weapons. inaction, rebels say, that embolden the syrian regime but now go much further. what was never supposed to happen again seems to be happening again and again. today's alleged atrocities took place just a few miles away from u.n. inspectors. they were denied access to the affected areas by the syrian government. the white house is demanding a full investigation. >
horrific images of dead and dying civilians that shocked the world. nbc's andrea mitchell begins our coverage tonight from washington. andrea, good evening. >> good evening, lester. brushing aside assad's denial, the administration's goal is to punish him and stop him from ordering another chemical attack. hoping to prevent more deaths from devastating weapons not seen in decades. and lester, fair warning, these latest pictures are very hard to watch. this is a different kind of war. a war that kills babies silently, suddenly, bathing them not in blood, but in the tears of a doctor. ghastly images of last week's attack. most too horrifying to show on television. emerging only today. this infant apparently barely a month old. and a new horror near aleppo, the opposition claims phosphorous bombs and napalm dropped on civilians monday, killing at least ten, wounding dozens. a report that has not been independently verified. in texas today, speaking to veterans, the vice president continued the drum beat to punish bashar al assad. >> there's no doubt who is responsible for this heinous u
released by the syrian opposition and unverified by nbc news. many too disturbing to broadcast. >> that is disturbing and horrible. >> reporter: we showed the footage to an independent chemical weapons expert. >> these pictures are obviously compatible with the well-known symptoms of nerve gas attack. >> reporter: not one attack, rebels say, but a barrage of surface-to-surface rockets filled with poison gas and fired at at least ten villages outside damascus early this morning. the syrian government denies using chemical weapons, something president obama has warned against. >> that's a red line for us, and there would be enormous consequences. >> reporter: but washington never backed up that threat, even after u.s. intelligence said in june that syria had used chemical weapons. inaction, rebels say, that embolden the syrian regime but now go much further. what was never supposed to happen again seems to be happening again and again. today's alleged atrocities took place just a few miles away from u.n. inspectors. they were denied access to the affected areas by the syrian gove
money in a week to head off to college today. "nightly news" begins now. >> announcer: from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news with brian williams". >>> good evening. i'm lester holt sitting in for brian. the world can only stand by and watch in horror today as one of the most vital countries in the middle east spiralled deeper into chaos and maybe even civil war. in egypt, two days after hundreds of its supporters died in the face of a government crackdown, the muslim brotherhood made good on its promise to take to the streets again in what it billed as a day of rage. the outcome was the one many feared. tonight an estimated 100 people are dead in cairo and other egyptian cities, and, once again, our richard engel was there to witness it all. he joins us now from cairo. richard, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. there are now open battles between supporters of egypt's democratically elected president and the military who removed him. and today the two sides clashed violently here in cairo. in cairo's aramsey square, just after three hou
that's disappearing fast. "nightly news" begins now. >> announcer: from nbc world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news with brian williams." >> good evening, i'm lester holt sitting in for brian. we shudder at the thought as to how this broadcast might have read. the word of shots fired inside mcnair discovery learning center in decatur, georgia, was quickly followed by images of s.w.a.t. teams surrounding the school, children being hurried to safety by teachers. a scene we have witnessed far too many times with horrifying outcomes. this time thankfully no one was injured, but as the school year begins around the country, today's scare raises new and difficult questions about what we have really learned from the newtown tragedy. nbc's gabe gutierrez joins us from decatur now with details. gabe? >> reporter: lester, all 800-plus students have been accounted for tonight, and no injuries have been reported. visitors are supposed to be buzzed into the school, but somehow the suspect got through. a terrifying scene in suburban atlanta. a reported gunman and an elementary sch
a tiny piece of this fire. nbc's tom costello is in groveland, california, to bring us the latest. tom, good evening. >> reporter: hi, lester. public utility crews say they are confident they can maintain water and power to san francisco. this station is serving as an information point so residents can get real time updates on exactly what the fire's status is now. 5,500 homes remain threatened and this fire is in very steeper it roin rain. >> still holding out. >> reporter: from the cockpit of a national guard c-130. >> got you in sight, coming in position mind you. >> reporter: to blackhawk helicopters, the view of the down-to-dusk aerial mission to attack a fire that has grown into the country's most serious, the challenge getting the water drop from so-called bambi buckets on just the right spot to give the ground crews a quick advantage. meanwhile on the ground, homeowners like careen and matt are on edge, leaving their home when the flames get too close and returning home when the winds seem to be in their favor. >> twice we went with friends and it got bad for pine mountain lake
to say, wait a minute. not all reporters but mark murray who is a political editor for nbc news is one of those that constantly duped by the obama administration and specifically on this story where he offered up what was supposedly a new plan on the economy. what we saw was it was a campaign speech, nothing new except mark murray jumped immediately here we go again. white house is making another concession and g.o.p. is blocking it yet again. what we don't see from mark murray that his wife was for obama and nbc has people out in front the administration and not getting called on it. >> jon: on the irs scandal, john fund from the national review noted this week that obama's admonition that we ignore the scandals has been picked up by many elite media supporters. as any journalist that has followed the trajectory of scandals knows that sex behavior is a clue those looking into the irs scandal may be getting warm? >> it was a brilliant piece. this is an example where the reality is catching up. another one is the reporters scandal. ask james rosen if he thinks they are phony or not. the
. many u.s. embassies and consulates remain closed. nbc white house correspondent kristen welker has the latest. >> reporter: back from camp david, president obama is getting the latest on the high alert. >> there's been an all of lot of chatter out there. chatter means conversation among terrorists about the planning that's going on. they're reminiscent of what we saw pre-9/11. >> reporter: according to two top u.s. officials, the terror plot could include one large attack or simultaneous attacks around the world, but the intelligence still isn't crystal clear. embassies and consulates from cairo to kabul are bracing themselves. although the streets of kabul were calm today, the embassy was still closed and will remain on high alert. national security officials told nbc news the threat is coming directly from al qaeda in the arabian peninsula based in yemen. a terror group that's gotten stronger in recent years. >> it's more dangerous because now we have 2.0 or 3.0, which is widely dispersed, a younger generation coming up with new ideas. >> reporter: meanwhile, the department of ho
sources tell nbc news, he was not having symptoms. the findings prompted doctors at texas health presbyterian hospital to insert a stent. a stent is metal scaffolding, placed into an artery narrowed by cholesterol plaque. it restores blood flow and prevents a heart attack. nearly half a million stent procedures are done every year, and sometimes more than one stent can be placed at a time. twice as many men than women will get a stent. though with heart disease increasingly recognized in women, doctors expect that number may go up. after the procedure, there is a long-term risk of clotting, so patients are usually prescribed blood thinners. with no previous heart trouble, experts say that president bush's recovery should be straightforward. >> following stent procedure, no most patients go back to normal daily activity. most go back to work in two to three days and able to fully resume their lifestyle. >> reporter: the president is expected to go home tomorrow. this afternoon, his daughter jenna bush hager tweeted a favorite family photo. he's well and we're eager for him to retu
's vladimir putin and those recent terror threats both expected to be front and center. nbc's tracie potts joins us live in washington with a preview. a lot on the plate today. >> reporter: a lot on the plate for the president to address before he heads off to the nine-day vacation in martha's vineya vineyard. it's not unusual to see these types of press conferences late summer. congress is gone all month which means republicans and a lot of his critics are gone. the president will have the stage. what will he talk about? he will undoubtedly be asked about canceling this conference, the summit, with vladimir putin with the russian president. why that happened and how much the asylum for edward snowden had to do with that decision. he will also likely be asked to address the terror threats in the middle east. now not just the one that shut down 19 embassies and consulates this week, but a new one that is now shutting down the consulate in lahore in pakistan. that's a separate issue, according to the state department. but clearly concerns throughout that region. egypt, syria, unrest in those
they are confident if they keep giving it all they have, they will eventually contain it. i'm jodi hernandez, nbc bay area news. >> thanks very much. >>> here's another live look at the fire. you can see it there, how massive it is and how much smoke coming up. bay area chief meteorologist jeff ranieri got a bird's eye view of the fire and he's here to explain what that's telling him about the fire, jeff? >> it's fascinating, terry. we look at the conditions and firefighters have had help when it comes to the weather. we're not looking at hundreds of lightning strikes across the sierra like yesterday. imagine how much more explosive this fire could be at the weather conditions were worse. which they could be this time for this time of year. winds are 10 to 20 miles an hour expected over the next 24 hours and humidity, 20 to 40% with temperatures in the upper 80s. even the humidity is not as dry as we could have. here's stunning video from at least 30,000 feet up sent to us by my facebook viewer, steve ziegler. you see cloud tops there. very reminiscent of a thunderstorm. looking at this, by all indic
is 7% up from 5% earlier today. nbc bay area's monty francis is joining us with the latest. >> reporter: good evening. you can see there's quite of bit of smoke in the air tonight. firefighters working and a couple of days ago the fire doubled in size. it has since slowed down quite a bit. it is a massive, unpredictable fire and firefighters are not taking any chances. as a huge plume of smoke billowed over the ridge, firefighters attended an evening briefing. hearing tips on how to avoid fatigue and stay safe. >> more importantly safety with those snags. be careful out there at night where you can't zee see those things. >> reporter: 1,000 fire personnel are living here in tents. a makeshift city of sorts with a few of the comforts of home. >> it's not bad. camping they provide great food, showers. it's great. >> thanks. >> crews headed out tonight to fight a fire that is already consumed an area bigger than the city of san jose. flames are now less than four miles from the reservoir where san francisco gets most of its water it. >> is possible it could reach there with its movement. t
, i'm jodi hernandez, nbc bay area news. >> thank you, jodi. longtime campers mourn if loss of the family camp. the state fire officials i were formed the officials that the camp had been destroyed. the camp has operated outside of yosemite since 1922. it's an escape for many bay area families who spend their time fishing, sitting around the camp fires and playing bingo. many long-time campers news of the fire marked a huge loss. >> the last news we heard was the camp was saved and put a big row of fire retardant so it was really sad this morning to find out it was gone. >> city of berkeley makes a profit off the camp and a city spokesperson said they don't have. specific figures but says a family of four pays 2500 a week to camp there but the city is still evaluating the next step. the nearly camp loss a building over the weekend but a piece of jew within history was saved. a camp counselor was able to retreef the torah and to bring it to safety at the camp san francisco headquarters. it travelled from evergreen loje near the rim fire and then to the camp office after a rig
going eastbound. it's much better than it was not that long ago. >>> now to a nbc bay area follow up. just days before the new span is set to open, cal trans has truck driver who died in 2009 who failed to navigate an s-curve. cal tran settled for $700,000. the lawsuit accused cal trans of not warning drivers about the sharp curve. state officials said he was traveling too fast and carrying more weight than he should have. the bridge is set to reopen at 5:00 tuesday morning. we've put a link on the top left hand corner of our home page. that's where you'll find the bridge closure guide. >>> they are the first killings in the last two years. a small east bay town dealing with a double homicide tonight. happened this morning along the 11th block of tara hills drieflt we have the details. >> reporter: good evening. this is not the first time police say they've been to this house here on this block. they say they had an issue reported here before at this house. investigators believe they have the right man in custody for the double homicide, but they've been interviewing the suspect all
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